Color Calibration for Print Work?

For those of you who are also doing print work, which color calibration device do you prefer? I frequently have issues with color accuracy and printed work, whether proofing on my in-house equipment or being printed at a commercial printer. I realize not everyone’s equipment is calibrated the same, but if I can at least get my in-house proofing printers calibrated, I can provide my commercial printer with printed proof for them to match.

I’m currently using a Spyder 3, but that only calibrates monitors. I have a friend who swears by the ColorMunki system, but I want to make sure it’ll work before spending $400.

Thanks!


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I’ve used ColorMunki Photo for a couple of years and am pleased with the results.


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Colour Munki has my vote, it’ll do print calibration too.

I have one that I loan to friends we all love calibrating.

Peter

RavenManiac mailto:email@hidden
25 October 2012 14:42
For those of you who are also doing print work, which color
calibration device do you prefer? I frequently have issues with color
accuracy and printed work, whether proofing on my in-house equipment
or being printed at a commercial printer. I realize not everyone’s
equipment is calibrated the same, but if I can at least get my
in-house proofing printers calibrated, I can provide my commercial
printer with printed proof for them to match.

I’m currently using a Spyder 3, but that only calibrates monitors. I
have a friend who swears by the ColorMunki system, but I want to make
sure it’ll work before spending $400.

Thanks!


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Best wishes Peter

Peter Tucker . Oxford, UK . email@hidden


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I used to use the Spyder 3 and switched to ColorMunki which offers more functionality than the Spyder. Yes it is more money, but is much better supported by the manufacturer in my opinion.


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Color and quality are absolutely subjective terms – and this is where
designers run into problems with printing companies and clients. I am more
comfortable with device-specific Colorsync profiles and a recent set of
Pantone books than anything else.

I recommend getting to know the print companies you use and profiling their
performance abilities. Ask them how they calibrate their presses, what kind
of inks they use, which papers they like. Try to get an idea of how they do
with heavy coverage projects, as well light screens. Get to know the
pressmen and their strengths and weaknesses. Make friends with the art
department - those guys will know all the tricks to getting the best from
their presses.

Of course, it also helps if you expand your own knowledge of the commercial
printing process and apply that to your design method. You will be amazed
at the number of awful, job-killing press-design disasters a colorimeter
will miss while an experienced eye will not.


Ernie Simpson

On Thu, Oct 25, 2012 at 11:43 AM, chuckamuck email@hidden wrote:

I used to use the Spyder 3 and switched to ColorMunki which offers more
functionality than the Spyder. Yes it is more money, but is much better
supported by the manufacturer in my opinion.


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You’re so funny Ernie. Just hard tell sometimes when you’re poo pooing or defending. :wink:


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On Thu, Oct 25, 2012 at 1:16 PM, chuckamuck email@hidden wrote:

You’re so funny Ernie. Just hard tell sometimes when you’re poo pooing or
defending. :wink:

Yeah, I know. With me there are always three sides to every coin.


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What justify’s the big price difference between the Photo and Display versions?

Todd

I’ve used ColorMunki Photo for a couple of years and am pleased with the results.


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Being in the print business for 25years + a real world example of colours printed on paper is top of the list. Get a decent Pantone book/s. It will give you a good feel of how colours print in CMYK.

Modern presses are very good these days for photo reproduction and probably wont shift their RIP colour settings just for you but may try and alter ink density on press to average the best colours on the job. RGB conversions to PDFs in Quark or InDesign are now pretty fool proof also. Where many designers go wrong is viewing work on a fantastic screen and expecting 4 colour process to cope with the subtle colours they’re creating. Generally asking far too much from the process. Make sure the tail is not wagging the dog.

David

http://www.printlineadvertising.co.uk

On 25 Oct 2012, at 17:51, Ernie Simpson email@hidden wrote:

and a recent set of
Pantone books than anything else.


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There’s a great tool called the Pantone Process Fanbook. It shows a side-by-side of each Pantone color in flat ink and CMYK equivalent. Compare that with your screen for a rude awakening in many cases. http://www.amazon.com/dp/1590651545

Walter

On Oct 25, 2012, at 2:42 PM, David Owen wrote:

Get a decent Pantone book/s. It will give you a good feel of how colours print in CMYK.


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