Does Anyone like the font Arial?

Is it just me, or do sites degrade somewhat when seen on a PC with Arial? Drives me nuts!


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Further to this, what are peoples favourite fonts to use - so that
they work equally well on both platforms. I imagine there are quite a
few instances where a site is designed, previewed on the Mac and then
the font has to be changed as it either isnt available on the PC or it
just doesn’t render well in IE.

Would be interesting to hear peoples opinions.

Nathan Garner
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Austin Wells Design Consultants
1 Elmgate Drive, Littledown, Bournemouth BH7 7EF
+44 (0)1202 301271
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On 3 Feb 2009, at 18:06, WebWorker wrote:

Is it just me, or do sites degrade somewhat when seen on a PC with
Arial? Drives me nuts!


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You are save using the standard font in the FW menu. You can add some extra fonts like Lucida and Impact.

Here’s a list of common Mac/Windows fonts

http://www.ampsoft.net/webdesign-l/WindowsMacFonts.html

and another one

http://media.24ways.org/2007/17/fontmatrix.html

Cheers, Marcel


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Thats great Marcel, a big help.

Which actually render well on a PC. If any?

Nathan Garner
Partner

Austin Wells Design Consultants
1 Elmgate Drive, Littledown, Bournemouth BH7 7EF
+44 (0)1202 301271
email@hidden
http://www.awdc-creative.com

Member of NAPP

On 4 Feb 2009, at 05:02, Helveticus wrote:

You are save using the standard font in the FW menu. You can add
some extra fonts like Lucida and Impact.

Here’s a list of common Mac/Windows fonts

Common fonts to all versions of Windows & Mac equivalents (Browser safe fonts) - Web design tips & tricks

and another one

Font Matrix

Cheers, Marcel


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I’ve found that either Verdana or Trebuchet are more attractive alternatives to Arial when I need a sans serif font. Also they both look fine on PC’s.

Richard

On 3 Feb 2009, 5:06 pm, WebWorker wrote:

Is it just me, or do sites degrade somewhat when seen on a PC with Arial? Drives me nuts!


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There’s very little love for Arial out there:

http://www.ms-studio.com/articles.html

Walter

On Feb 3, 2009, at 1:06 PM, WebWorker wrote:

Is it just me, or do sites degrade somewhat when seen on a PC with
Arial? Drives me nuts!


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Sometime around 4/2/09 (at 10:42 -0500) pixelart said:

I’ve found that either Verdana or Trebuchet are more attractive
alternatives to Arial when I need a sans serif font. Also they both
look fine on PC’s.

Verdana, Georgia and, to a slightly lesser extent Trebuchet were
designed to work well at small text sizes on screens. Arial wasn’t
meant for this job.

There’s an interesting (to a type-obsessive like me) discussion of
the origins of Arial here:

http://www.ms-studio.com/articles.html

Although do be aware that there’s more vitriol aimed at Arial than I
think is fair. It is unsuitable for body text on screen, just as
Helvetica is, but in print it has characteristics that make it a
slightly softer, less rectangular choice than Helvetica.

The following text comes from the embedded description found in some
versions and formats of Arial:

 "Arial contains more humanist characteristics
  than many of its predecessors and as such is
  more in tune with the mood of the last decades
  of the twentieth century. The overall treatment
  of curves is softer and fuller than in most
  industrial style sans serif faces. Terminal
  strokes are cut on the diagonal which helps to
  give the face a less mechanical appearance."

This may be modelled on Helvetica to an extent, but it is unarguably
also more humanistic.

Just don’t use it on screen! :slight_smile:

k


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On 10 Feb 2009, at 12:39, Keith Martin wrote:

This may be modelled on Helvetica to an extent, but it is unarguably
also more humanistic.

And it hurts the eyes.

A plague on Arial in all its forms.

;o)

Heather


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A plague on Arial in all its forms.

Certainly in all its non-printed forms. And always when not using the
original Monotype designs.

:slight_smile:

k


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I think that possibly we have all gotten so unhappy with Arial because
it is often used within a typographically-hamstrung Windows
application (but I repeat myself).

I would posit that any typeface[1], when lovingly set and spaced, and
attended to with care – care born either of years of experience with
old-world tools or really good “default settings” (as in recent Adobe
apps with Optical Spacing turned on) – will look pretty good.

Conversely, even the finest OpenType face, with thousands of hand-
tuned kerning pairs, will look like the typographic equivalent of a
slowly-spreading puddle of dog-sick when “set” using Microsoft Word on
Windows.

Walter

  1. I’m still not sure about Arnold Boecklin.

On Feb 10, 2009, at 9:25 AM, Keith Martin wrote:

A plague on Arial in all its forms.


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