**EU Cookies Law 26th May 2012

What plans is anyone making regarding the new law regarding warning tracking visitors with cookies on your sites? With a fine of up to £500,000 it something to be taken seriously.

And this looks like this effects anyone using Google analytics on their websites for a start. That a lot of web sites!

http://www.ico.gov.uk/news/latest_news/2011/~/media/documents/library/Privacy_and_electronic/Practical_application/guidance_on_the_new_cookies_regulations.ashx

The neatest solution I’ve found so far it this script:

David Owen { Freeway Friendly Web hosting and Domains }

http://www.ineedwebhosting.co.uk | http://www.PrintlineAdvertising.co.uk


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On 2 May 2012 11:21, David Owen email@hidden wrote:

The neatest solution I’ve found so far it this script:
Cookie Control by CIVIC - GDPR Cookie Compliance Solution

The trouble is once you ask users to opt in your analytics will become
effectively useless as they’ll no longer reflect actual use. A FOI
request revealed that the ICO itself experienced a 90% drop in cookie
acceptance:

http://chinwag.com/blogs/sam-michel/cookiepocalypse-implementing-new-law-drops-use-90

Roger

Roger Houghton
Bath, Somerset
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I did not had plans yet other than removing them until a good solution was available. Maybe Softpress or someone from the team can help all the EU customers by providing an action that does something similar to the one from civicuk.


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Many users won’t understand and will fail to approve and your google analytics will fail hopelessly, not even recording a hit and bounce away from a home page.

David

On 2 May 2012, at 12:13, Roger Houghton wrote:

The trouble is once you ask users to opt in your analytics will become
effectively useless as they’ll no longer reflect actual use. A FOI
request revealed that the ICO itself experienced a 90% drop in cookie
acceptance:


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I want to confirm, this is just for uk / eu right ??

Sent from my iPad

On May 2, 2012, at 7:54, David Owen email@hidden wrote:

Many users won’t understand and will fail to approve and your google analytics will fail hopelessly, not even recording a hit and bounce away from a home page.

David

On 2 May 2012, at 12:13, Roger Houghton wrote:

The trouble is once you ask users to opt in your analytics will become
effectively useless as they’ll no longer reflect actual use. A FOI
request revealed that the ICO itself experienced a 90% drop in cookie
acceptance:


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Yes, and if I’m not mistaking only for third party cookies such as Google Analytics.


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It seems that, for example, using a cookie to track a shopping basket is OK and doesn’t need permission. Other cookie usage falls into a grey area depending on your intent.

It is worth noting that it’s not just cookies that this legislation covers, but small files and data dropped by Flash applications, as well as the more advanced database storage used by HTML5.

Certainly, Google Analytics falls under this banner, and is one of the cookies that needs to seek permission. It’s also likely that those FaceBook like buttons would also require permission.


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Don’t forget FreeCounter2 – Cookie-free since 1999! Originally written by me as an experiment, meant to plumb the width and depth of the Freeway universe, it’s survived through four different hosting providers, two complete re-writes of the logic engine, and more. And it does not use any cookies.

Granted, it does maybe a fraction of what GA does. Any purty graphs or analysis will have to come by virtue of you downloading the data and running them through Numbers or Excel. But if you’re trying to track basic stats, it will do the job for you.

http://freewaypro.com/counter2

Walter

On May 2, 2012, at 6:21 AM, David Owen wrote:

What plans is anyone making regarding the new law regarding warning tracking visitors with cookies on your sites? With a fine of up to £500,000 it something to be taken seriously.

And this looks like this effects anyone using Google analytics on their websites for a start. That a lot of web sites!

http://www.ico.gov.uk/news/latest_news/2011/~/media/documents/library/Privacy_and_electronic/Practical_application/guidance_on_the_new_cookies_regulations.ashx

The neatest solution I’ve found so far it this script:
Cookie Control by CIVIC - GDPR Cookie Compliance Solution

David Owen { Freeway Friendly Web hosting and Domains }

http://www.ineedwebhosting.co.uk | http://www.PrintlineAdvertising.co.uk


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…but small files and data dropped by Flash applications, as well as the more advanced database storage used by HTML5.

Ugh, that’s not good. Although it is not a fully supported part of the html5 spec yet, it is a disappointment going forward if that functionality will be penalized.


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Yes - things like these have to be taken serious but honestly:

“How should we find a way when each single EU member is boiling their own cook?”

It’s to me actually like:

Let’s wait and see how the web-community is trying to solve it and let’s then decide the best way to handle.

Strangely enough, the last sentence of an article I read was the recommend to add this to your liability insurance.

The cookie control is a cooool tool (I wish I could use it for much more stuff) so I added it immediately to my index page. But it uses jQuery so I’m afraid of code conflict. I think I should add a:

My cent, so there are only € 499 999,99 left to be paid.

Cheers

Thomas


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“The stupid EU cookie law (and why it should die)”

“Definitive guide to the Cookie Law”
http://silktide.com/cookielaw

Roger

Roger Houghton
Bath, Somerset
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I don’t think there’s anything evil or wrong about the cookie law, it’s actually legislating good common sense. I have always, on every browser, set the cookies to “from the current server only”. The law is not saying that your server can’t send cookies, just that third parties (ad networks, Google, oh wait – that’s the same thing) can’t do so without the user saying it’s okay.

I wish this was more than just the EU, personally.

A lot of the people who are arguing the loudest about this are upset because things are changing. Just because comparatively few people knew about the privacy implications of the default settings (allow from anyone) doesn’t mean that it was right or even necessary.

I predict a new renaissance in server log analysis software, and people will just get on with their lives. Google ads may become (slightly) less creepy. Maybe.

Walter

On May 4, 2012, at 7:04 AM, Roger Houghton wrote:

“The stupid EU cookie law (and why it should die)”
http://youtu.be/9hLmX9FX2KA

“Definitive guide to the Cookie Law”
http://silktide.com/cookielaw

Roger

Roger Houghton
Bath, Somerset
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The future could be saner. Or it could be like this…


Ernie Simpson

On Fri, May 4, 2012 at 9:02 AM, Walter Lee Davis email@hidden wrote:

I predict a new renaissance in server log analysis software, and people
will just get on with their lives. Google ads may become (slightly) less
creepy. Maybe.

Walter


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At 09:02 -0400 4/5/12, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

I don’t think there’s anything evil or wrong about the cookie law,
it’s actually legislating good common sense. I have always, on every
browser, set the cookies to “from the current server only”. The law
is not saying that your server can’t send cookies, just that third
parties (ad networks, Google, oh wait – that’s the same thing)
can’t do so without the user saying it’s okay.

I wish this was more than just the EU, personally.

A lot of the people who are arguing the loudest about this are upset
because things are changing. Just because comparatively few people
knew about the privacy implications of the default settings (allow
from anyone) doesn’t mean that it was right or even necessary.

I predict a new renaissance in server log analysis software, and
people will just get on with their lives. Google ads may become
(slightly) less creepy. Maybe.

Walter

You have a rosy view of UK law Walter. I haven’t studied the rules in
depth, but ‘same domain’ cookies don’t seem to be allowed except via
the ‘necessary’ condition. This is open to interpretation and only
those with deep pockets can argue on the interpretation. Our
lawmakers are very good at making laws that everyone wants but
wording them in some way that has unwanted impact.

David


David Ledger - Freelance Unix Sysadmin in the UK.
HP-UX specialist of hpUG technical user group (www.hpug.org.uk)
email@hidden
www.ivdcs.co.uk


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On May 4, 2012, at 11:00 AM, David Ledger wrote:

At 09:02 -0400 4/5/12, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

I don’t think there’s anything evil or wrong about the cookie law,
it’s actually legislating good common sense. I have always, on every
browser, set the cookies to “from the current server only”. The law
is not saying that your server can’t send cookies, just that third
parties (ad networks, Google, oh wait – that’s the same thing)
can’t do so without the user saying it’s okay.

I wish this was more than just the EU, personally.

A lot of the people who are arguing the loudest about this are upset
because things are changing. Just because comparatively few people
knew about the privacy implications of the default settings (allow
from anyone) doesn’t mean that it was right or even necessary.

I predict a new renaissance in server log analysis software, and
people will just get on with their lives. Google ads may become
(slightly) less creepy. Maybe.

Walter

You have a rosy view of UK law Walter. I haven’t studied the rules in
depth, but ‘same domain’ cookies don’t seem to be allowed except via
the ‘necessary’ condition. This is open to interpretation and only
those with deep pockets can argue on the interpretation. Our
lawmakers are very good at making laws that everyone wants but
wording them in some way that has unwanted impact.

If you build any sort of Web application (Rails, PHP, ColdFusion) you have to maintain state between one page and the next, since HTTP is a stateless protocol (each request stands alone, and doesn’t connect to any other request). While it is possible to fall back to querystring tokens (?u=asdf7234ajt or something like that) it is not all that secure without another factor. In that case, it is a business imperative that cookies be allowed, or your shopping/banking/whatever site can’t function at all, and I can’t imagine a court or judge that would think otherwise given even a cursory brief of the problem and available solutions.

If all you are doing is tracking individual users around your site for statistical reasons (as Google Analytics does) then you truly don’t need cookies at all if you have access to the server. (That’s what I meant by a boom in server log analysis software – the Apache server already tracks users by IP address and request, and good log analysis software can stitch this all together into a very compelling set of graphs and charts, all without any cookies at all.) Even if you don’t have access to the server, you can still grab a meaningful percentage of the necessary stats from a simple beacon image. I haven’t heard any indication that this is forbidden specifically. It’s how FreeCounter2 works, and how FreeCounter did before it.

What you can’t do without third-party cookies is track individuals around the larger Web, and I can only say that’s a good thing, both for reasons of privacy and to enforce constraints on the advertising industry. Constraints are good – they force you to be smarter and to focus your efforts where they will do some good. The current state of affairs is heavily over-balanced on the side of the advertisers; they have “total information” on everyone, and can micro-target their attacks to individuals if they like. This incredible precision leads to a mind-numbing mediocrity in the actual message delivered, though, because they are able to get such a precisely targeted message in front of so few people, they also have to make a lot of similar-but-slightly-different ads, rather than concentrating on making one or two insanely great messages that larger groups of people will respond to. Thus fragmentation or market leads to fragmentation of message and devolves to the mean of whatever you can crank out a lot of in a hurry. I say good riddance to that!

Walter

David


David Ledger - Freelance Unix Sysadmin in the UK.
HP-UX specialist of hpUG technical user group (www.hpug.org.uk)
email@hidden
www.ivdcs.co.uk


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That’s right. Anyone using the likes of Webalizer or AWStats (often supplied in your hosting control panel) reads the server logs so you’re OK using that. (no cookies)

It will be interesting to see ether what Google does about this and will everyone totally ignore it?

David

On 4 May 2012, at 14:02, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

I predict a new renaissance in server log analysis software


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Good news from the ICC. See this blog post for the details http://www.targetinternet.com/digital-marketing-news-cookie-guidance-has-arrived/

I will be providing an updated privacy policy, as the advice (if you can even call it that) from the information commissioners office and the ICC seem to be encouraging.

“In practice we would expect you to provide clear information to users about analytical cookies and take what steps you can to seek their agreement. This is likely to involve making the argument to show users why these cookies are useful. Although the Information Commissioner cannot completely exclude the possibility of formal action in any area, it is highly unlikely that priority for any formal action would be given to focusing on uses of cookies where there is a low level of intrusiveness and risk of harm to individuals. Provided clear information is given about their activities we are highly unlikely to prioritise first party cookies used only for analytical purposes in any consideration of regulatory action.”


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Hi all

Sorry for coming to this so late.

Could putting a statement on the home page of a site stating something along the lines of the following suffice?

This website uses “service x” purely to gather site statistics which involves a cookie or cookies being saved on your computer. If you do not wish such cookies to be saved to your computer please enable that option in your browser or change to a browser with such an option.

The only problem then would be that the home page would already have saved a cookie before the page was displayed and taking the code off the home page wouldn’t make the statistics as effective.

All seems very chicken and egg.

Thanks

Gordon
http://www.gordonlow.net


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If I’m reading the latest on this correctly, it would be sufficient to put a line or two in your Privacy Policy stating that you use third-party cookies for site performance tracking only, and that should do the job. If you want to make a larger message about it on the home page (and I’m not clear why you would) then you could add the advice to your users that they could set their browsers to allow cookies from the current site only. That disables third-party cookies and will still allow them to use e-commerce sites and Web applications.

Walter

On May 14, 2012, at 6:47 AM, Gordon Low wrote:

Hi all

Sorry for coming to this so late.

Could putting a statement on the home page of a site stating something along the lines of the following suffice?

This website uses “service x” purely to gather site statistics which involves a cookie or cookies being saved on your computer. If you do not wish such cookies to be saved to your computer please enable that option in your browser or change to a browser with such an option.

The only problem then would be that the home page would already have saved a cookie before the page was displayed and taking the code off the home page wouldn’t make the statistics as effective.

All seems very chicken and egg.

Thanks

Gordon
http://www.gordonlow.net


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An extra option on how to warn the users: cPrompt - Michael Wright

Is there someone that can translate this and how to use it in Freeway Pro?


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