Lines become solid when printing + pdf problem

Hi,

I have 2 problems:

  1. I draw family trees and connect persons with lines, but I choose to make them partly transparent (50%) to make them less dominant. But when I print directly from Intaglio, they are printed solid. Why? The image is also much darker as it looks on screen.

  2. Initially, I wanted to print from a pdf copy, but I get these weird blank (white) squares randomly placed on the image. But only when printing and they are not visible on the pdf-image. I print on A3+ paper and the 10 to 15 squares that appear squares are about 2 x 1.5 cm.

I print on a Canon IX4000, A3+ from OSX1.4.2, Intaglio 3.0.1 using Canon Photo Rag A3+. (It is quite expensive, so I hope to avoid too much problems) I use the printers color settings.

To be quite frank: I have never understood all the issues regarding printing and probably need some basics :wink:

Thanks,
Litta


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On Dec 21, 2008, at 1:07 PM, Litta wrote:

Hi,

I have 2 problems:

  1. I draw family trees and connect persons with lines, but I choose
    to make them partly transparent (50%) to make them less dominant.
    But when I print directly from Intaglio, they are printed solid.
    Why? The image is also much darker as it looks on screen.

  2. Initially, I wanted to print from a pdf copy, but I get these
    weird blank (white) squares randomly placed on the image. But only
    when printing and they are not visible on the pdf-image. I print on
    A3+ paper and the 10 to 15 squares that appear squares are about 2
    x 1.5 cm.

I print on a Canon IX4000, A3+ from OSX1.4.2, Intaglio 3.0.1 using
Canon Photo Rag A3+. (It is quite expensive, so I hope to avoid
too much problems) I use the printers color settings.

To be quite frank: I have never understood all the issues regarding
printing and probably need some basics :wink:

Neither do I but, if you meant above OSX 10.4.2, it wouldn’t hurt to
upgrade to 10.4.11, the last of the tigers.

Regards
–schremmer


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I meant 10.4.11 :wink:


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-and I have ordered a new Mac (hurrah!)

24 inch - 4GB RAM - 3,06 GHz Intel - NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GS graphic card

and of course Leopard.

Hopefully that solves some problems, e.g. slow scrolling of the image in Intaglio.


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On Dec 21, 2008, at 1:57 PM, Litta wrote:

-and I have ordered a new Mac (hurrah!)

24 inch - 4GB RAM - 3,06 GHz Intel - NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GS
graphic card

and of course Leopard.

Congratulations.

I will be with 10.4.11 on a PC G4 for the foreseeable future but I
don’t do much in Intaglio, just mathematical graphics and so can’t
suggest anything.

Regards
–schremmer


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I printed several overlapping 50% transparent lines on white paper (standard settings). A second test had the same lines on a coloured background and a third test was saved as a PDF. On ordinary laser paper, the colours were fine—a bit on the dull side, but that’s to be expected. Better paper tends to produce better results.
Neither the Intaglio document nor the PDF produced the squares you report (my printer is a Xerox Phaser 6130N).

Printing is a complex procedure and I only know some of the basics, but the first problem to overcome is colour. On the screen, you’re looking at RGB images; the picture is made up of red, green and blue on a white background.

Printers use 4 colours to do the same thing; it’s called ‘CMYK’ or ‘4-colour process’. The problem is that CMYK colours are duller than RGB. To illustrate this:

  1. Draw a box and fill it with a common colour. Open the Color Picker and choose Red (for some strange reason, Apple call it Maraschino).
  2. Open the Solid Color palette (Window menu). The Red appears in the colour well. The drop-down menu will probably say ‘RGB’.
  3. Press the menu and choose ‘CMYK’. The red, which was bright and vibrant, becomes darker—almost a maroon colour—and that’s the problem.

Many designers recommend designing in CMYK. Intaglio makes it easy to create a palette of CMYK colours; find out what colours work for you and save them in the Library.


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What you say is that I should do my work in CMYK ?

When I choose CMYK in the settings, will then all the colors I see be in that format ? (Stupid question ?)

In the ‘color space’ where you choose this setting, the CMYK setting is either default or generic, while the RGB setting actually allows me to choose my printers profile. A bit confusing!

The printer does not say anything about CMYK…


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