[Pro] Ligatures R Us

Just discovered a great feature that I never knew of in Freeway Pro (could be Express to for all I know). I recently loaded the full Adobe Caslon font family. I needed the ligature feature as well as the 17th Century font forms for some work I am producing.

After setting up the full Adobe font family, I went over to the Text Inspector and discovered a new menu item labeled ‘fi’. This turns out to be full controls for the advanced features of Adobe fonts. It may well work for other font families, but I haven’t had time to investigate that.

Take a look at the banner of my primary site. The nav bar remains Georgia for cross-platform compatibility. The banner graphic is now correct for Adobe Caslon, complete with ligatures and font formations.

Very good work Freeway People!

Gary


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After setting up the full Adobe font family, I went over to the Text Inspector and discovered a new menu item labeled ‘fi’.

I believe that only applies to OpenType fonts.


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Which I try to use as much as possible.


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The funny thing for me is that Freeway 1.0 did this in 1997 – with GX
fonts. (Anyone besides Keith and me remember those?) I still had some
GX fonts on my Mac in OS 9, and could access these effects in Freeway
3. The location was kind of funny, hanging off of the Style / Font
menu in a sub-sub-menu, but you could choose all the variants of a
font – special characters, swash variations in some faces, a lot of
richness. I wonder if OpenType is just GX dressed differently?

Walter

On May 27, 2009, at 10:36 PM, toolemera wrote:

Which I try to use as much as possible.


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GX is more precise in that it matches glyph contextual parameters. Opentype, developed by Microsoft and adopted by Adobe, has more narrow parameters. From what I hear, Font designers may be restricted by the limits of Opentype. But for folks like me, the lower price for an entire font family in Opentype v Truetype for Adobe or Linotype fonts can add up.

Plus, certain recreated fonts, such as Adobe Caslon Pro, contain accurate constructions of classic or early fonts that make it important for my uses. The guy who participated in the development of Adobe Caslon is also a letterpress printer. He took care to specify accuracy in reproduction of the resident ligatures within regular, bold, semibold and italic versions. Sorry for the monologue. I spend a lot of time reading and thinking about 17th and 18th C stuff, so I can get pedantic about it.

If you really want to bend your brain, this page provides more than you would ever want to know about GX and Opentype Fonts

http://developer.apple.com/textfonts/WhitePapers/GXvsOTLayout.html

Best
Gary


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On 28 May 2009, at 04:26, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

(Anyone besides Keith and me remember those?)

raises hand

=o)

Heather


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And another hand raised here - then I go back umpteen years before PC
to when every single character was crafted from metal and still placed
by hand in many instances. (A right venerable oldie, to ‘quoin’ a
phrase). :wink:

Colin

On 28 May 2009, at 08:08, Heather Kavanagh wrote:

On 28 May 2009, at 04:26, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

(Anyone besides Keith and me remember those?)

raises hand

=o)


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On 28 May 2009, at 08:30, Colin Alcock wrote:

And another hand raised here - then I go back umpteen years before
PC to when every single character was crafted from metal and still
placed by hand in many instances. (A right venerable oldie, to
‘quoin’ a phrase). :wink:

And I’m old enough to know what a quoin is. Not that I mean to ‘diss’
myself here …

best wishes,

Paul Bradforth

http://www.paulbradforth.com


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My first formal typesetting education began on a PhotoTypositor[1] and
a process camera. Then there was that CompuGraphic in college, lots of
Letraset press-type before, during, and after that. A lot of ordering
type from actual typesetting businesses (remember those?), and then
that fateful Mac IIci at my best friend’s agency…

Walter

  1. http://bellsouthpwp2.net/b/c/bcarberry/tp.html

On May 28, 2009, at 7:52 AM, Paul Bradforth wrote:

And I’m old enough to know what a quoin is. Not that I mean to
‘diss’ myself here …


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Well then Walter, you might enjoy the two photographs on this page:

http://toolemera.com/Trades%20%26%20Crafts/toolemera.com_tr.html

I have to update the descriptions with some new information, but the images remain the same.

Gary (who started with Freeway Express 2 but started really on a MacPlus as his first computer. Wow! 5 mb of hard disk space was incredible!


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Have you seen this one?

Letterpress geeks unite!

Walter

On May 28, 2009, at 4:28 PM, toolemera wrote:

Well then Walter, you might enjoy the two photographs on this page:

http://toolemera.com/Trades%20%26%20Crafts/toolemera.com_tr.html

I have to update the descriptions with some new information, but the
images remain the same.

Gary (who started with Freeway Express 2 but started really on a
MacPlus as his first computer. Wow! 5 mb of hard disk space was
incredible!


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That’s a great site. I have it on my RSS reader too.

I first learned basic letterpress in the 5th grade in Print Shop. Now I just read about it! I’m a neophyte when it comes to letterpress stuff, but improving my knowledge. It’s the librarian in me… I just gotta know more. Just ordered a copy of the 1898 reprint of Moxon’s work on printing which should make for interesting reading, long ‘s’ and all.

Gary


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Its been a while and I never did the inky stuff but the mallet (along with a flat piece of wood) I think was used to knock back any protruding type in the chase.

I was a process engraver for my sins with a local newspaper and general printer. Carbon arc lamps anyone.

There was a tangible air of despair I recall, when the typesetters switched away from the hotmetal keyboard layout to the ‘new’ qwerty keyboards, realising that any secretary off the street could do their job.
Ah progress !!

seoras

http://toolemera.com/Trades%20%26%20Crafts/toolemera.com_tr.html

I have to update the descriptions with some new information, >but the images remain the same.


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According to a friend who is an experienced letterpress printer, the mallet was used to produce a proof of a page prior to final printing. I have to add this information along with some other tidbits to the page. I’ve been working on getting my shop live (currently partly hidden and lacking active payments yet at http://shop.toolemera.com ) and waiting for my check disk to come in from the media shop.

Plus I really have to add more stuff to the Printing section!

Gary


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On 28 May 2009, at 23:28, toolemera wrote:

According to a friend who is an experienced letterpress printer, the
mallet was used to produce a proof of a page prior to final printing.

Gives a new meaning to the phrase ‘Just bang it out quick’ :slight_smile:

best wishes,

Paul Bradforth

http://www.paulbradforth.com


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Then there was that CompuGraphic in college, lots of Letraset press-type before, during, and after that. A lot of ordering type from actual typesetting businesses (remember those?), and then that fateful Mac IIci at my best friend’s agency…

Yep I remember all of that… in my case, the Mac IIci was my wife’s


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That’s a really nice site and I especially like the way the text
renders in both Mac and PC (IE7 & 8) I guess they wanted to get that
spot on. What typefaces are being employed for the body copy? The San
Serif on the left and the Serif in the central column, it’s being held
in an external css file I think.

Nathan Garner
Partner

Austin Wells Design Consultants
1 Elmgate Drive, Littledown, Bournemouth BH7 7EF
+44 (0)1202 301271
email@hidden
http://www.awdc-creative.com

Member of NAPP

On 28 May 2009, at 21:41, Walter Lee Davis wrote:

Have you seen this one?

http://www.briarpress.org/

Letterpress geeks unite!

Walter

On May 28, 2009, at 4:28 PM, toolemera wrote:

Well then Walter, you might enjoy the two photographs on this page:

http://toolemera.com/Trades%20%26%20Crafts/toolemera.com_tr.html

I have to update the descriptions with some new information, but
the images remain the same.

Gary (who started with Freeway Express 2 but started really on a
MacPlus as his first computer. Wow! 5 mb of hard disk space was
incredible!


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Sometime around 29/5/09 (at 08:23 +0100) Nathan Garner said:

What typefaces are being employed for the body copy? The San Serif
on the left and the Serif in the central column

The sans is Lucida Grande, although on PCs it will be shown as Arial.
The serif is Georgia.

Lucida Grande is a very nice font for screen use at body text sizes.
It is a core part of the fonts found in the Mac OS, so it is web-safe
for Macintosh users. Arial actually sets over 10% more tightly,
enough to produce noticable text reflow. Verdana is a better second
choice font as it sets only a few percent wider. it is also closer
than Arial to Lucida Grande in character appearance, although it is
slightly cruder.

Lucida Grande is essentially a version of Lucida Sans with a larger
character set, although it does have slightly altered metrics.

Suggested font set:

“Lucida Grande”, “Lucida Sans”, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif

k


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Thanks Keith, good insight there! Appreciated.

Nathan Garner
Partner

Austin Wells Design Consultants
1 Elmgate Drive, Littledown, Bournemouth BH7 7EF
+44 (0)1202 301271
email@hidden
http://www.awdc-creative.com

Member of NAPP

On 29 May 2009, at 10:30, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 29/5/09 (at 08:23 +0100) Nathan Garner said:

What typefaces are being employed for the body copy? The San Serif
on the left and the Serif in the central column

The sans is Lucida Grande, although on PCs it will be shown as Arial.
The serif is Georgia.

Lucida Grande is a very nice font for screen use at body text sizes.
It is a core part of the fonts found in the Mac OS, so it is web-
safe for Macintosh users. Arial actually sets over 10% more tightly,
enough to produce noticable text reflow. Verdana is a better second
choice font as it sets only a few percent wider. it is also closer
than Arial to Lucida Grande in character appearance, although it is
slightly cruder.

Lucida Grande is essentially a version of Lucida Sans with a larger
character set, although it does have slightly altered metrics.

Suggested font set:

“Lucida Grande”, “Lucida Sans”, Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif

k


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BTW, there’s a book coming out that might be of interest to
type-obsessed folk like y’all…

It is called 1000 Fonts, and I wrote a significant chunk (roughly
70%) of it. It shipped a few weeks ago in the US and will ship in the
UK by the end of June. I’ve just received my author’s sample copies
this week.

I don’t get royalties for this, just a single fee. However, if you
want to buy from Amazon the following (shortened) links will ping me
a tiny percentage, eventually. :slight_smile:

http://tinyurl.com/1000fonts-paperback (paperback edition, nicer cover)

http://tinyurl.com/1000fonts-hardback (hardback edition, nicer whole object)

In some listings Amazon shows the author as Bob Gordon. In fact, Bob
was the editor; the authors were Graham Davis, Robin Dodd (one of my
old typography lecturers), and me.

Whether or not y’all use those links, get the book. I really
enjoyed doing this, and I think it will be of interest to many people
for a very long time.

k


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