[Pro] Validation Errors: Parse Error Sans?

Hi,

I’m trying to validate a clients site with W3C. With the CSS validator, I keep getting a lot of ‘Parse Error Sans’ and ‘Parse Error Verdana’. http://tinyurl.com/7ogqh4x.

With the Markup Validation, I’m receiving several instances of the error ‘end tag for “map” which is not finished’ http://tinyurl.com/72ez696.

I’m stuck. I don’t understand what I need to change in my file.

Any thoughts?


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Here’s an example from your stylesheet:

h3 { color:#553f30; font-family:'Arimo', sans-serif; Lucida Sans; font-size:17px; margin-top:0px; font-weight:normal }

Look at the ‘font-family’ attribute. There should be a comma (,) between each font name but there are a couple semi-colons instead. A semi-colon is used to separate attributes, not values. There seem to be a lot of instances of this error. Start there.

Todd
http://xiiro.com


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Okay. Thanks. I will fix it.


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By the way, it’s not necessary to add the exact same font-family attribute to every style as you’ve done (or in many cases have done). If you define the default font-family in the tag it will ‘cascade’ (as in 'C’SS) down to all other styles. It’s a lot of redundancy for no reason.

Todd
http://xiiro.com


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Excellent!! Parsing errors are gone. Normally I don’t put a semicolon, but I was using several Google fonts, and I thought that I was supposed to copy and paste their code. So your suggestion was great.

Not sure I get what should be done regarding the body tag …


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Not sure I get what should be done regarding the body tag …

Think of the body tag as the overlord of everything that’s placed within it, because in fact, all your content resides within the body tag. So if you define your basic site-wide styles in the body tag then they will apply to everything else unless you specifically define another style to a specific div or run of text. It’s how CSS works.

So if, for example, you defined your font-family attribute once in the body tag it will carry through to everything else, again, unless you specify otherwise. That way you don’t have all that unnecessary styling info. You could do the same with font-color, font-size or anything, really.

Make sense?

Todd
http://xiiro.com


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How would I define the body tag … i.e., I have a style named .bodytext. Would I edit the style and then select “p” in the drop down tag options?


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When you look at the markup for just about any web page, you’ll see it’s
divided into two major areas - all the code between the and
tags, and all the code between the and tags. The head is for
CSS and Script and Meta code, the body area is for all your text and
graphic content.

A CSS style that targets the body looks like this:

body { font-family: Helvetica; }

This is essentially telling the browser that ALL the text in the of
your page gets styled with Helvetica. This has an obvious time-saving
advantage over repeating the same style for every single instance of text
on your page. It also reduces excessive and unnecessary page code which
really can compound and complicate troubleshooting problems with your site.

Creating a CSS style for the body tag is also extremely easy. When you make
a new style in Freeway Pro’s Style Editor, there are two input fields in
the upper right of the window… marked Tag and Name. By default, FWP
automatically puts a generic style name in the Name field which designates
the new style as a Class Style in CSS parlance. To create a Tag
Style
simply type the tag
name ( in this case, body ) into the Tag field. Delete anything in the
Name field so it’s empty, then choose whatever attributes you want your
text to have. You are done and good to go.

But what if you want your headers to be different from the rest of the
text? No problem. You can set the styles for them separately using their
tag style names, h1, h2, etc.

In fact, CSS let’s you use shortcuts for Tag styles that share the same
attribute. How would it look?

h1, h2, h3, h4 { font-family: Verdana; }

So just like with the Tag style we made for the body tag, we would type tag
names for this new style into the Tag field of the Style Editor. We can
group all the header tags together, separated by commas, into the Tag field
– h1, h2, h3, h4 – then making sure to delete anything from the Name field.
Finish by selecting the common attributes and be done with it.

You would still need to have the individual header tag styles to be able to
apply them and provide them with non-common attributes like size, but for
the most part styles like these are automatically applied.


Ernie Simpson

On Sat, Jun 23, 2012 at 1:18 AM, rebeccintosh
email@hiddenwrote:

Excellent!! Parsing errors are gone. Normally I don’t put a semicolon,
but I was using several Google fonts, and I thought that I was supposed to
copy and paste their code. So your suggestion was great.

Not sure I get what should be done regarding the body tag …


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instead of selecting “p” in the dropdown of the Tag field, make a new style
and type the name “body” (no quotes) into that same Tag field. Then make
sure the Name field is empty and set the font style. Bingo! Then you won’r
need to style your “p” text.

Your .bodytext style is not a Tag style but a Class style. The easy way to
remember the difference is that Tag styles affect HTML tags, while Class
styles only affect selections of things. Class styles also must be applied
whereas Tag styles mostly automatically apply themselves.


Ernie Simpson

On Sat, Jun 23, 2012 at 2:19 AM, rebeccintosh
email@hiddenwrote:

How would I define the body tag … i.e., I have a style named .bodytext.
Would I edit the style and then select “p” in the drop down tag options?


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Got it. Thank you so much for your time explaining it. It makes sense now.


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I am pleased to be of help. CSS and HTML code are like cheesecake - you
don’t have to eat the whole thing at one sitting.

In fact – eaten a sliver at a time – leaves you room to sneak back later
for a little more. :wink:


Ernie Simpson

On Sat, Jun 23, 2012 at 2:59 AM, rebeccintosh
email@hiddenwrote:

Got it. Thank you so much for your time explaining it. It makes sense now.


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