Title Tag

I have a question regarting the title tag

I can set a title tag via the inspector

Can I set a secont title tag via the meta-tags

One for google, one for yahoo?


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I can set a title tag via the inspector
Can I set a secont title tag via the meta-tags
One for google, one for yahoo?

The page title text field in the Inspector palette creates the title
tag in the published HTML file code. This is what produces the title
in the browser window’s title bar. You can of course have only one
page title tag per page.

Meta tags are different things. These are normally used to provide a
potted description of the page (rich in keywords, preferably), and a
collection of relevant keywords in simple list form. There are other
meta tags, but these two are the most common.

Meta tags are not the solution to getting found on search engines. As
SearchEngineWatch.com puts it,

“Meta tags are not a magic solution.
Meta tags are not a magic solution.
Meta tags are not a magic solution.”

http://searchenginewatch.com/2167931

Also, you don’t have to (and indeed you can’t) create different
description/keyword meta tags for different search engines.

Anyway, remembering that you make your Title tag by typing into the
Title text field in the Inspector, here’s how you can add your own
meta tags:

  1. Go to Page > Meta Tags
  2. Click New
  3. Put “description” (without the quotes) into the Name field and a
    sentence or two of description into the Value field.

Repeat steps 1 & 2
3) Put “keywords” into the Name field and your keywords, separated by
commas, into the Value field.

But please DO go read the above link. Meta tags are not a magic solution.

k


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Thank you Keith. Sorry, my question was not quite clear.

(My question is: is there a difference between the “inspector title” an the “meta tag title”.)

This is what I’ve learned: Title, Description, h1 and h2 are the most important informations for search enginges.

Keywords obviously not anymore. I placed the “important words” congruent in:

  • title
  • text h1 h2
  • description
  • keywords

Using the 2 different main words (not toghether, one after one) for my business (marketing), my webpage jumped from outerspace up to position 4 and 18. Within a very short time.

My descrtiption is 70 characters long.

And I sent the sitemap.xml to the search engines.


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Sometime around 6/6/09 (at 09:59 -0400) Thomas said:

Thank you Keith. Sorry, my question was not quite clear.

(My question is: is there a difference between the “inspector title”
an the “meta tag title”.)

None at all; the Inspector’s Title field for the page is what is put
into the title tag in the page’s head.

(But one purely technical comment: the title tag isn’t a meta tag.
Those begin with “meta”.)

This is what I’ve learned: Title, Description, h1 and h2 are the
most important informations for search enginges.

Title, header tags for text, the ‘anchor text’ of inbound links to a
page, the file name - all help. The meta description tag is often
used when showing a page’s description in search results, but it has
from little to no impact on where a page actually comes in searches.
It is obviously very important, but not in quite the way that some
people think.

Excellent work on optimising your pages for those two search terms.
As long as those are ones your potential customers are likely to use
you’ve done extremely well!

k


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Hi Thomas, I pondered this point a month back.
It depends on which title you want to see first…

The HTML title that is at the Top is what a browser sees first,
If google does not find enough info on the first title it should go to the next? that’s the theory. anyway…

Place a title into the Page /HTML Markup and paste into the first "before "
This of course places another title before the FW one.

< title> ★ ★ ★ - TYPE AWAY - ★ ★ ★< /title >

Adding &#9733 which is the character ★, this is another way to embellish a title using Special Characters for HTML & XHTML.

Pete


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Cool thank you – you guys are excellent.


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Sometime around 6/6/09 (at 20:56 -0400) Pete said:

The HTML title that is at the Top is what a browser sees first,
If google does not find enough info on the first title it should go
to the next? that’s the theory. anyway…

Surely this won’t validate?

Place a title into the Page /HTML Markup and paste into the first
"before "
This of course places another title before the FW one.

SURELY this won’t validate! The title tag is supposed to be within
the head structure, not before it. There is also only supposed to
be one title tag in a page.

I cheerfully admit that I’m talking without experimenting first, but
this does seem a risky approach. Google has a massively strong
preference for things that are a regular part of human-readable web
content. It doesn’t like things that are there purely for search
engines (other than a Google site index, which is rather different).

Duplicating a tag to pack in extra content purely for search engines
sounds fishy to me; too much the sort of thing that can be
counter-productive. Google does penalise sites that it suspects of
using search engine spamming tricks.

< title> ★ ★ ★ - TYPE AWAY - ★ ★
★< /title >

Putting funky entity codes to produce stars etc. in a title is fine
if you’re trying to catch a human’s attention in search results, but
not all browsers will display those correctly in the window’s title
bar. Test on an inconspicuous page before applying to your entire
site. If browser irritation or swelling appears discontinue use
immediately.

k


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Where would you place it, Keith? An how?


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Just to make it clear - its like Keth said: Title Words set in the inspectors palette appear as word,word,word within the head structure, not before.


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Hi,
Putting a title above the head is just a regular property which can be used in most page elements. Many pages have multiple bodies and even heads, I can’t connect this at all to spamming. If this is faulty HTML? Why doesn’t an error console pick it up. Also Special characters show up in every browser I tested… Safari, firefox, camino, internet explorer, Opera, Navigator etc… please point out a current browser it won’t work on? To me it’s not about thinking outside the head, it’s about thinking outside the box.
All the best.
Pete


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Browsers are enormously flexible creatures. They can turn the most
awful tag soup into something viewable. That doesn’t make the tag soup
valid, or prove anything besides how flexible the browsers are.

Most browsers go through a stage of error correction before trying to
display anything, and these sorts of egregious errors would be dealt
with at that point. I don’t know what they would make of multiple
heads and bodies, some might just use the first (or last) of each they
encounter, others might get creative and try to merge them, although
there are a guarantee of several clashes, and it would be nearly
impossible to guess the intent of the author in that case.

An HTML page may have at most:

  • One DOCTYPE
  • One HTML tag
  • One HEAD tag, as a direct child of the HTML tag
  • One Body tag, as a direct child of the HTML tag
  • Any number of STYLE tags, as long as they are all direct children of
    the HEAD
  • Any number of SCRIPT tags, as long as they are properly escaped, and
    are either direct children of the HEAD or children of the BODY.
    (SCRIPT tags cannot be nested within one another, but they can live
    pretty much anywhere else that you could get away with putting a block-
    level tag.)
  • Any number of LINK tags, as long as they are direct children of the
    HEAD
  • Any number of META tags, as long as they are direct children of the
    HEAD
  • Any number of (properly nested) structural and inline tags, as long
    as they are in the BODY

That is, practically speaking, it. Anything that doesn’t meet those
criteria is not, by definition, an HTML page.

Walter

On Jun 7, 2009, at 12:22 PM, Pete wrote:

Many pages have multiple bodies and even heads, I can’t connect this
at all to spamming. If this is faulty HTML? Why doesn’t an error
console pick it up


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Sometime around 7/6/09 (at 12:34 -0400) Walter Lee Davis said:

Anything that doesn’t meet those criteria is not, by definition, an HTML page.

Or it is, to put it another way, faulty HTML. As in “good luck, all
bets are off”.

k


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I see you’ve noted ‘Anchor Text’. Am I right in thinking that this is
the text on the page that is then created as a hyperlink?

So rather than ‘Click Here’ I would use ‘Health and Fitness’ etc.

Nathan Garner
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FW5 Pro | MacBook Pro | Leopard

On 6 Jun 2009, at 15:51, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 6/6/09 (at 09:59 -0400) Thomas said:

Thank you Keith. Sorry, my question was not quite clear.

(My question is: is there a difference between the “inspector
title” an the “meta tag title”.)

None at all; the Inspector’s Title field for the page is what is put
into the title tag in the page’s head.

(But one purely technical comment: the title tag isn’t a meta tag.
Those begin with “meta”.)

This is what I’ve learned: Title, Description, h1 and h2 are the
most important informations for search enginges.

Title, header tags for text, the ‘anchor text’ of inbound links to a
page, the file name - all help. The meta description tag is often
used when showing a page’s description in search results, but it has
from little to no impact on where a page actually comes in searches.
It is obviously very important, but not in quite the way that some
people think.

Excellent work on optimising your pages for those two search terms.
As long as those are ones your potential customers are likely to use
you’ve done extremely well!

k


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Sometime around 8/6/09 (at 10:08 +0100) Nathan Garner said:

I see you’ve noted ‘Anchor Text’. Am I right in thinking that this
is the text on the page that is then created as a hyperlink?

So rather than ‘Click Here’ I would use ‘Health and Fitness’ etc.

Exactly so. EXACTLY so. All link text, aka anchor text, is an
opportunity in SEO terms. Make sure it reflects the contents of the
link destination in some way.

Remember to add title attributes to the link, too. See the Edit
Hyperlink dialog for this. Note that this text will appear as a
tooltip, so write it with that as well as SEO in mind.

k


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Great Keith, thanks.

Nathan Garner
Partner

Austin Wells Design Consultants
1 Elmgate Drive, Littledown, Bournemouth BH7 7EF
+44 (0)1202 301271
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http://www.awdc-creative.com

Member of NAPP

On 8 Jun 2009, at 14:09, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 8/6/09 (at 10:08 +0100) Nathan Garner said:

I see you’ve noted ‘Anchor Text’. Am I right in thinking that this
is the text on the page that is then created as a hyperlink?

So rather than ‘Click Here’ I would use ‘Health and Fitness’ etc.

Exactly so. EXACTLY so. All link text, aka anchor text, is an
opportunity in SEO terms. Make sure it reflects the contents of the
link destination in some way.

Remember to add title attributes to the link, too. See the Edit
Hyperlink dialog for this. Note that this text will appear as a
tooltip, so write it with that as well as SEO in mind.

k


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Keith, when TextMate makes a link, it goes out on the Web and reads
the TITLE tag of the page you’re linking to, and inserts that as the
TITLE attribute of the A tag. Does that sound like cargo cult
programming or a very good idea, SEO-wise, that these two things match
up so exactly?

Walter

On Jun 8, 2009, at 9:09 AM, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 8/6/09 (at 10:08 +0100) Nathan Garner said:

I see you’ve noted ‘Anchor Text’. Am I right in thinking that this
is the text on the page that is then created as a hyperlink?

So rather than ‘Click Here’ I would use ‘Health and Fitness’ etc.

Exactly so. EXACTLY so. All link text, aka anchor text, is an
opportunity in SEO terms. Make sure it reflects the contents of the
link destination in some way.

Remember to add title attributes to the link, too. See the Edit
Hyperlink dialog for this. Note that this text will appear as a
tooltip, so write it with that as well as SEO in mind.

k


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Sometime around 8/6/09 (at 10:47 -0400) Walter Lee Davis said:

Does that sound like cargo cult programming or a very good idea,
SEO-wise, that these two things match up so exactly?

Not bad, not bad at all. Of course, this does assume that the title
of the destination is relevant and useful, not another of the billion
“home” titles out there.

The important thing is to get keywords in there that are found in the
destination. Beyond that, I don’t think there will be a worthwhile
difference. However, where the destination page is well-crafted with
a meaningful and keywork-enriched title this trick is a good one.

k


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