4 web design trends for 2015 that will change your job forever

4 web design trends for 2015 that will change your job forever http://www.creativebloq.com/web-design/trends-2015-101413303

David

http://www.printlineadvertising.co.uk
http://www.davidowendesign.co.uk


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4 web design trends for 2015 that will change your job forever
http://www.creativebloq.com/web-design/trends-2015-101413303

I’m amazed there are no comments… especially as the fourth trend The
decline of the website
was possibly the most interesting to anyone
building websites of any kind.

It’s a good conclusion and I agree with it. You’d think though that I’d be
used by now to how everything is constantly redefined.


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As for the decline aspect, his movie example was good but it addresses one general type of model. Sure, certain types of businesses (e.g. news outlets, movie finders etc.) will - due to the nature and frequency of the content they provide to their unquestionably huge audience - benefit from an app-based delivery platform vs. a website, but there are still all sorts of scenarios where a website will be the best (or only) option for delivering content.

What the author refers to as “decline” I see as evolution. I agree that a shift towards deeply integrated application-based delivery platforms has begun, but in no way do I see the website going the way of the dinosaur, at least not in my lifetime. Both platforms can compliment one another.

To me the most relevant point of the article was the need to adapt. The inevitable evolution of how content is perceived, accessed and delivered doesn’t need to be a threat to web designers/developers if we’re willing and capable of adjusting how we view our role within the larger context. Whether that means a focus on specialization as the author speculates, I don’t know. But what doesn’t require adaptation? It’s not like the Web hasn’t been evolving since it’s genesis. After all, look at how our process for designing/building sites has changed in the past 10 years, and most of us have adapted.

And while I agree that automated tools may lessen the need for people with technical know-how, no matter how efficient those tools become, I will not accept that knowledgeable people with hands-on skills will ever become truly obsolete. An industry that (potentially) embraces a lack of the technical “how” and “why” just doesn’t seem sustainable to me. Inevitably someone still needs to understand the bigger picture; to build things or fix problems that can’t be distilled to a point-n-click gesture.

Knowledge and understanding always have value and even if that’s not where things are headed in the short-term; even if the bar continues to be lowered by “good enough” expectations, I really believe those qualities and skills still matter. When has dumbing-down anything ever been the best way forward?

Todd

I’m amazed there are no comments… especially as the fourth trend The
decline of the website
was possibly the most interesting to anyone
building websites of any kind.


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