[Pro] Client content management w/Freeway site

I’m learning site building w/Freeway but don’t know much about content management issues when it doesn’t involve me.

Clients have asked if they can do content management on my sites built with Freeway, they don’t own Freeway. I don’t know what to answer.

How do non-Freeway owners do content management on their sites built originally with Freeway Pro? I know I have a
lot to learn and there are still many things I don’t understand.

Thanks,

Patty


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There’s a couple of options; generally speaking I think a lot of people set up a simple CMS (content management system) for their clients to be able to add content without having Freeway.

http://www.softpress.com/kb/questions/43/Options+for+Allowing+a+Client+to+Edit+a+Freeway+Generated+Web+Site

~katie

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:28 AM, chickdesign wrote:

I’m learning site building w/Freeway but don’t know much about content management issues when it doesn’t involve me.

Clients have asked if they can do content management on my sites built with Freeway, they don’t own Freeway. I don’t know what to answer.

How do non-Freeway owners do content management on their sites built originally with Freeway Pro? I know I have a
lot to learn and there are still many things I don’t understand.

Thanks,

Patty


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Thank you very much, Wow, more stuff to cram into my head!

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:36 AM, Katie Wagner wrote:

There’s a couple of options; generally speaking I think a lot of
people set up a simple CMS (content management system) for their
clients to be able to add content without having Freeway.

http://www.softpress.com/kb/questions/43/Options+for+Allowing+a+Client+to+Edit+a+Freeway+Generated+Web+Site

~katie

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:28 AM, chickdesign wrote:

I’m learning site building w/Freeway but don’t know much about
content management issues when it doesn’t involve me.

Clients have asked if they can do content management on my sites
built with Freeway, they don’t own Freeway. I don’t know what to
answer.

How do non-Freeway owners do content management on their sites
built originally with Freeway Pro? I know I have a
lot to learn and there are still many things I don’t understand.

Thanks,

Patty


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If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep
option found in the Softpress article. Using the suite of Actions for
WebYep, it’s very straightforward to set up areas for the client to
edit or add content.

Colin

On 7 Jan 2010, at 19:31, Patricia Wisner wrote:

Thank you very much, Wow, more stuff to cram into my head!

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:36 AM, Katie Wagner wrote:

There’s a couple of options; generally speaking I think a lot of
people set up a simple CMS (content management system) for their
clients to be able to add content without having Freeway.

http://www.softpress.com/kb/questions/43/Options+for+Allowing+a+Client+to+Edit+a+Freeway+Generated+Web+Site

~katie

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:28 AM, chickdesign wrote:

I’m learning site building w/Freeway but don’t know much about
content management issues when it doesn’t involve me.

Clients have asked if they can do content management on my sites
built with Freeway, they don’t own Freeway. I don’t know what to
answer.

How do non-Freeway owners do content management on their sites
built originally with Freeway Pro? I know I have a
lot to learn and there are still many things I don’t understand.

Thanks,

Patty


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Thanks Colin, I’m perusing a minor overview on the WebYep site and it
looks doable.
Thanks for your help.

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 11:33 AM, Colin Alcock wrote:

If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep
option found in the Softpress article. Using the suite of Actions
for WebYep, it’s very straightforward to set up areas for the client
to edit or add content.

Colin

On 7 Jan 2010, at 19:31, Patricia Wisner wrote:

Thank you very much, Wow, more stuff to cram into my head!

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:36 AM, Katie Wagner wrote:

There’s a couple of options; generally speaking I think a lot of
people set up a simple CMS (content management system) for their
clients to be able to add content without having Freeway.

http://www.softpress.com/kb/questions/43/Options+for+Allowing+a+Client+to+Edit+a+Freeway+Generated+Web+Site

~katie

On Jan 7, 2010, at 10:28 AM, chickdesign wrote:

I’m learning site building w/Freeway but don’t know much about
content management issues when it doesn’t involve me.

Clients have asked if they can do content management on my sites
built with Freeway, they don’t own Freeway. I don’t know what to
answer.

How do non-Freeway owners do content management on their sites
built originally with Freeway Pro? I know I have a
lot to learn and there are still many things I don’t understand.

Thanks,

Patty


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Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 19:33 +0000) Colin Alcock said:

If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep option

Not just if you’re new to Freeway either. I find it seriously useful.

Patty, note that there are two parts to WebYep: (1) the WebYep
actions, and (2) the WebYep server software.

Part 1: You buy the WebYep actions once. This is installed into
Freeway, job done. All you need to do with it is use it in your
Freeway pages.

Part 2: You buy a new copy of the WebYep server code for each new
site that you want to make client-editable in this way. This is
tweaked to have your choice of client username and password for
logging in, then uploaded to the web site. (Dead easy, honest!)

The costs for both are absolutely reasonable, but it is worth noting
from the start that each new site you want to WebYep-ify needs to
have its own copy of the server software bought separately.

k


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Keith, thanks, but I have a few clarifying questions for you:

Are Part 1 and Part 2 two steps in a 2-step process to allow client
CMS, or are they two different options I can choose from to
give a client CMS privileges, using either Part 1 or instead Part 2?
Obviously, I’m confused being new to this.

Regarding Part 1: So with this option, I design a site in Freeway, and
the pages are content editable/manageable by my
client, even though they don’t own Freeway? But the client has to buy
WebYep server software, is that correct?

Thank you for all your help.

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 12:01 PM, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 19:33 +0000) Colin Alcock said:

If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep
option

Not just if you’re new to Freeway either. I find it seriously
useful.

Patty, note that there are two parts to WebYep: (1) the WebYep
actions, and (2) the WebYep server software.

Part 1: You buy the WebYep actions once. This is installed into
Freeway, job done. All you need to do with it is use it in your
Freeway pages.

Part 2: You buy a new copy of the WebYep server code for each new
site that you want to make client-editable in this way. This is
tweaked to have your choice of client username and password for
logging in, then uploaded to the web site. (Dead easy, honest!)

The costs for both are absolutely reasonable, but it is worth noting
from the start that each new site you want to WebYep-ify needs to
have its own copy of the server software bought separately.

k


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On 7 Jan 2010, at 20:01, Keith Martin wrote

Not just if you’re new to Freeway either. I find it seriously
useful.

Quite true, Keith, but like Freeway, you can understand the basics and
be up and running quite quickly: then expand on it use with experience.
(I use it on some quite complex sites as well as just for basic page
content editing). For someone learning the game, it travels with you
until you really need something more extensive, such as Expression
Engine.

Colin


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What Keith is saying is that (1) you buy the set of Actions to use
within your Freeway application and they add the extra functionality
you need to make sections of your FW produced site editable in any
browser, by the client.

The second part is your licence to use WebYep on each web site you
design and is linked to that web site’s unique URL. However you can
test sites without the licence and then buy the licence when you go
live. What you do have to do is upload the WebYep system files to each
web site’s host server (easy via FTP using Transmit or Fetch).

So download the ‘plain version’ and use it in demo mode first; then
buy your licence when you are ready - charging the client each time
you create a new site.

HTH Colin.

On 7 Jan 2010, at 20:33, Patricia Wisner wrote:

Keith, thanks, but I have a few clarifying questions for you:

Are Part 1 and Part 2 two steps in a 2-step process to allow client
CMS, or are they two different options I can choose from to
give a client CMS privileges, using either Part 1 or instead Part 2?
Obviously, I’m confused being new to this.

Regarding Part 1: So with this option, I design a site in Freeway,
and the pages are content editable/manageable by my
client, even though they don’t own Freeway? But the client has to
buy WebYep server software, is that correct?

Thank you for all your help.

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 12:01 PM, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 19:33 +0000) Colin Alcock said:

If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep
option

Not just if you’re new to Freeway either. I find it seriously
useful.

Patty, note that there are two parts to WebYep: (1) the WebYep
actions, and (2) the WebYep server software.

Part 1: You buy the WebYep actions once. This is installed into
Freeway, job done. All you need to do with it is use it in your
Freeway pages.

Part 2: You buy a new copy of the WebYep server code for each new
site that you want to make client-editable in this way. This is
tweaked to have your choice of client username and password for
logging in, then uploaded to the web site. (Dead easy, honest!)

The costs for both are absolutely reasonable, but it is worth
noting from the start that each new site you want to WebYep-ify
needs to have its own copy of the server software bought separately.

k


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Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 20:38 +0000) Colin Alcock said:

For someone learning the game, it travels with you until you really
need something more extensive, such as Expression Engine.

Absolutely.

k


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Are Part 1 and Part 2 two steps in a 2-step
process to allow client CMS, or are they two
different options I can choose from

Hi Patty,

You need both parts. The WebYep action suite
gives you tools within Freeway to make it easy to
build pages with editable areas. The alternative
to using this is doing it all in code.
Technically that’s possible, but no, don’t even
think about this. :slight_smile:

The second part is what lives in the web site.
This is the CMS (Content Management System)
itself, the thing that provides the intelligence
that lets users log in, edit the areas that you
allowed to be changed, and send those edits back.
It also makes sure that anyone who wanders over
to look at the site is shown the latest edited
content.

With a WebYep-enabled site, all someone needs in
order to edit the content is a web browser. Oh,
and the username and password required for
someone to log in and make edits.

You can charge the client directly for WebYep or
build the cost into your overall fee.

The WebYep action suite for Freeway:
http://www.max-izzat.co.uk/
£20 (about $32), a one-off cost

The WebYep CMS:

¤29 (about $42 or £26) per domain

Shout if you need more info.

k


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That makes things clearer, thank you very much Colin.
I have a lot of learning to do : )

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 12:52 PM, Colin Alcock wrote:

What Keith is saying is that (1) you buy the set of Actions to use
within your Freeway application and they add the extra functionality
you need to make sections of your FW produced site editable in any
browser, by the client.

The second part is your licence to use WebYep on each web site you
design and is linked to that web site’s unique URL. However you can
test sites without the licence and then buy the licence when you go
live. What you do have to do is upload the WebYep system files to
each web site’s host server (easy via FTP using Transmit or Fetch).

So download the ‘plain version’ and use it in demo mode first; then
buy your licence when you are ready - charging the client each time
you create a new site.

HTH Colin.

On 7 Jan 2010, at 20:33, Patricia Wisner wrote:

Keith, thanks, but I have a few clarifying questions for you:

Are Part 1 and Part 2 two steps in a 2-step process to allow client
CMS, or are they two different options I can choose from to
give a client CMS privileges, using either Part 1 or instead Part
2? Obviously, I’m confused being new to this.

Regarding Part 1: So with this option, I design a site in Freeway,
and the pages are content editable/manageable by my
client, even though they don’t own Freeway? But the client has to
buy WebYep server software, is that correct?

Thank you for all your help.

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 12:01 PM, Keith Martin wrote:

Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 19:33 +0000) Colin Alcock said:

If you are still quite new to Freeway, I can recommend the WebYep
option

Not just if you’re new to Freeway either. I find it seriously
useful.

Patty, note that there are two parts to WebYep: (1) the WebYep
actions, and (2) the WebYep server software.

Part 1: You buy the WebYep actions once. This is installed into
Freeway, job done. All you need to do with it is use it in your
Freeway pages.

Part 2: You buy a new copy of the WebYep server code for each
new site that you want to make client-editable in this way. This
is tweaked to have your choice of client username and password for
logging in, then uploaded to the web site. (Dead easy, honest!)

The costs for both are absolutely reasonable, but it is worth
noting from the start that each new site you want to WebYep-ify
needs to have its own copy of the server software bought separately.

k


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Thanks Keith, you rock!!!

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 1:08 PM, Keith Martin wrote:

Are Part 1 and Part 2 two steps in a 2-step process to allow client
CMS, or are they two different options I can choose from

Hi Patty,

You need both parts. The WebYep action suite gives you tools within
Freeway to make it easy to build pages with editable areas. The
alternative to using this is doing it all in code. Technically
that’s possible, but no, don’t even think about this. :slight_smile:

The second part is what lives in the web site. This is the CMS
(Content Management System) itself, the thing that provides the
intelligence that lets users log in, edit the areas that you allowed
to be changed, and send those edits back. It also makes sure that
anyone who wanders over to look at the site is shown the latest
edited content.

With a WebYep-enabled site, all someone needs in order to edit the
content is a web browser. Oh, and the username and password required
for someone to log in and make edits.

You can charge the client directly for WebYep or build the cost into
your overall fee.

The WebYep action suite for Freeway:
http://www.max-izzat.co.uk/
£20 (about $32), a one-off cost

The WebYep CMS:
http://www.obdev.at/products/webyep/index.html
¤29 (about $42 or £26) per domain

Shout if you need more info.

k


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Just to add to this and offer another option (FREE)

I have been fiddling with Pulse CMS http://www.pulsecms.com/

“Pulse is a simple content management system designed for small websites. It enables you to take an existing site and add content management in just five minutes.”

Worth a look but not as extendable as WebYep?

David


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Hi, David -

I’ve been fooling around with WebYep and I think it’s got a lot of possibilities, but there’s one question I have (I think I know the answer, but…)

If I construct a site that will service a “group” of different users, each with his/her own page and sub-pages:

  1. Can I use my WebYep license and develop a multi-user sign in and validation so that users are unable to edit another’s page(s)?

  2. If this cannot be done as in above, it would seem that I’d have to have a separate license for each user (and webyep-system folder per each page, too). Is this correct?

Bart

Bart Bartholomay
HAB Marketing
3725 8th Lane
Vero Beach, FL 32960
772.299.6352
Filemaker Business Alliance
http://HABMarketing.com

On Jan 7, 2010, at 5:33 PM, DeltaDave wrote:

Just to add to this and offer another option (FREE)

I have been fiddling with Pulse CMS http://www.pulsecms.com/

“Pulse is a simple content management system designed for small websites. It enables you to take an existing site and add content management in just five minutes.”

Worth a look but not as extendable as WebYep?

David


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On 7 Jan 2010, 9:51 pm, Bart Bartholomay wrote:

  1. Can I use my WebYep license and develop a multi-user sign in and validation so that users are unable to edit another’s page(s)?

There is no built-in mechanism for multiple logins.

  1. If this cannot be done as in above, it would seem that I’d have to have a separate license for each user (and webyep-system folder per each page, too). Is this correct?

The liscense is per domain, not user. Each domain you install WebYep on must have it’s own license.


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Sometime around 7/1/10 (at 17:51 -0500) Bart Bartholomay said:

  1. If this cannot be done as in above, it would seem that I’d have
    to have a separate license for each user (and webyep-system folder
    per each page, too). Is this correct?

I don’t think it can currently use multiple logins for a regular
setup. However, the license is definitely per domain - it isn’t tied
to users. I haven’t tried installing WebYep into multiple separate
folders and giving each a different login name/password, but that
might work.

k


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Bart,

You could perhaps use WebYep along with another 3rd party product like Sitelok - http://www.vibralogix.com/sitelokpw/index.php

Going this route you could password protect specific WebYep editable pages for specific users that all reside in one domain.


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The latest nightly build of WebYep does support mutiple logins -
checkout the Obdev site

David

On 7 Jan 2010, at 23:02, “chuckamuck” email@hidden wrote:

There is no built-in mechanism for multiple logins.


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Thanks David, a very good tip : )

Patty

On Jan 7, 2010, at 2:33 PM, DeltaDave wrote:

Just to add to this and offer another option (FREE)

I have been fiddling with Pulse CMS http://www.pulsecms.com/

“Pulse is a simple content management system designed for small
websites. It enables you to take an existing site and add content
management in just five minutes.”

Worth a look but not as extendable as WebYep?

David


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