[Pro] Responsive site works on desktop but not on iPhone

Hi All

First foray into FW7 and the new responsive site features. Because I new nothing about designing this way, I thought I’d use one of the built-in templates. I’ve created the basic site and after a lot of messing around and experimenting, got it to work on the desktop with four breakpoints, where closing up the window in Safari causes the site to reformat to fit the narrower width.

All well and good I thought, until I opened the site in Safari on my iPhone 4S (iOS 8.4.1) where it appeared to show the default full width version of the site. I don’t have another mobile device to test it on so I don’t know if it’s an iOS thing or whether I’ve done something fundamentally wrong with the design or settings.

Anyone any ideas?

http://sandringhammobility.co.uk/test


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http://sandringhammobility.co.uk/test

The link that you provided is showing the webpage in a frame. The actual link that the frame is pointing to shows the page correctly on an iOS phone. Viewing the source for your test page reveals the actual URL of your page.

So the real question to ask is why is your test page being served from within a frame? The obvious but important follow-up question would be, is this the way web pages are supposed to be served?

What you are learning is…

  • that your responsive design is working as advertised
  • that iframes are a crappy way to serve your content
  • that knowing something about how code works can be valuable
  • that knowing something beyond the mere economics of how hosting providers work can be helpful

All you need is to speak knowledgeably with your hosting provider about possible solutions, or change to a provider with a less crappy method for serving your content.


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Thanks The Big Erns

It’s a client’s site where they have their own domain registered with their own ISP. They asked me to design their site and opted for us to host it for them. Instead of transferring the domain to us, I thought it would be better to redirect to our hosting. I had two options - one where our domain name would appear at the top of the window (which we wouldn’t want), and the other, where theirs would. I chose the latter. Obviously there’s more to it than meets the eye!

Presumably I now have two more options - either transfer the domain to us or host the site with them.


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If they wanted you to host their site then you haven’t fulfilled their wishes.

Clarify the situation with them and act accordingly.

David


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They wouldn’t understand the situation David, so it’s pointless even bringing it up with them.

But just for the sake of clarity, who is hosting the site if not us? Do the site and domain have to be with the same provider to be recognised as ‘hosted’?


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In cases like this MY hosting package allows me to create Addon Domains (in cPanel). This then also creates a folder within my hosting space for me to upload the client’s files to. You would need a similar feature to host additional websites in your space which may be included in your package or could cost you more.

Then I go to where the CLIENT has registered their domain name and change the name servers in their control panel to point to where I am hosting their website in my space. They would need to have this feature as part of the domain name service - some offer it for free, others will charge extra for it.

There can then be a slight delay until everything goes live and then THEIR domain name, which appears in the browser’s address bar, points to MY space (if that makes sense).

Here’s a quick example:

I am hosting http://www.rmbuses.com/ within my webspace at http://www.gordonlow.net/ so in actual fact their website can also be found, rather clumsily, at http://www.gordonlow.net/rmbuses.com/

So, no, the site and domain names do not have to be with the same provider. In fact I think it is better not to have them together just in case something goes wrong with your hosting then you still have control of the domain names and can direct them somewhere else.

Hope this helps.

All the best

Gordon
http://www.gordonlow.net/


On 16 Apr 2016, at 2:28pm, neil.west1 email@hidden wrote:

They wouldn’t understand the situation David, so it’s pointless even bringing it up with them.

But just for the sake of clarity, who is hosting the site if not us? Do the site and domain have to be with the same provider to be recognised as ‘hosted’?


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There’s a number of different ways to handle this. First, though, you need to understand the relationship between domain registration, DNS, and hosting. They are three different things, and although they are often done by the same company or service, they do not need to be.

Registration

Your hostname is registered with IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) through a registrar. All this means is that it is yours, and nobody else can use it. It has nothing to do with anything else. If you register with GoDaddy, but host and DNS elsewhere, you still need to pay to keep the name.

DNS

Your name is associated with one or more IP (Internet Protocol) addresses. These generally look like 192.168.1.2, and they are the true names of the Internet. DNS lets you say, “this machine 1.1.1.2 is mail.example.com” and “that machine 1.1.1.3 is www.example.com”. (DNS also lets you say that one numerical IP address is responsible for a thousand different named Web sites. This rock is the foundation for a number of fortunes in the hosting space, because it makes shared hosting possible.) DNS also lets you set up a special pointer called an MX record, which defines a particular machine as being the responsible party for all of your e-mail.

In many cases, when you register your domain name, the registrar will sell you a package that includes DNS, and often also hosting. The fact that they do this doesn’t mean that that’s the only way to do things. It’s not even a very good idea, because if one of their services goes down, then all of them may, and then you have no way to recover until they do.

Hosting

A server, usually running Apache, responds to requests for a particular domain name by locating the (configured) matching folder on its disk and serving up the requested file. It’s usually a lot more complex than that, but at its core, that’s how it works. As mentioned earlier, an Apache server can handle thousands of individual sites without breaking a sweat. If you’re Apple, then the telescope is turned around the other way, and you have dozens of Apache servers all hosting the same site, and a device sitting in front of them called a load balancer that decides which server will get the next request. In order for this part to work, the other two must be properly configured.

Now as to how this works together to manage your own case, here’s an example from my own far-flung empire of Apache servers.

One of my servers is named test.walterdavisstudio.com. It’s a Digital Ocean droplet, which means that it is a virtual private server, I have root on it, and nobody else is sharing its resources. I am my own hosting provider, in other words.

ActionsForge.com is set in the DNS (can’t recall where that runs, may be CloudFront for that one) to be a CNAME (like an alias) for test.walterdavisstudio.com, so the requests for that address are routed over the Internet to my server. But the requests retain the original hostname, so when it gets to my server, Apache knows which site to show.

That same server also hosts the billing application for Inlay, FreeCounter, and FreewayCast. And I have other servers, naturally.

So your client could keep on registering their domain where they do, and then they could configure their DNS to point their domain at your server. You would need to add a configuration in your cPanel or similar to recognize requests for that domain name, but once that’s done, your server would host their site as a separate domain from your own. There would be no need for “cloaking” frames or other hacky work-arounds.

If your own hosting setup is a “cheap and cheerful” shared server, where the owners lock down what you can do with your account, you may still be able to make this work by creating a subdomain within your own domain, then editing the configuration to add a ServerAlias directive allowing that subdomain to accept requests for your client. I don’t know if this can be done in an .htaccess file (which would be the ultimate way to do it while nobody is looking) or if it needs to be done in the Apache configuration, but the basic idea is that you set up clientname.yourdomain.com and then add ServerAlias clientname.com to that subdomain’s configuration.

Walter

On Apr 16, 2016, at 9:28 AM, neil.west1 email@hidden wrote:

They wouldn’t understand the situation David, so it’s pointless even bringing it up with them.

But just for the sake of clarity, who is hosting the site if not us? Do the site and domain have to be with the same provider to be recognised as ‘hosted’?


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Thank you Gordon and Walt. For the most part I’m aware of what you’re both saying. I drop in and out of web design as it’s not the first string to my bow. The problem is that because I design for web so infrequently, I end up having to relearn things because the software has advanced or because I’ve just forgotten what I learned last time!

We ‘host’ sites for several clients or upload into their own web space. In this case I logged onto the client’s control panel (where their domain is registered) and opted for web forwarding where, as explained above, I had two choices. I’d totally forgotten about DNS pointing which I’ve done with previous web sites. Unlike previous sites however, the client has their email set up with this provider, and I don’t want to mess with that part of it. I’d rather leave the email where it is but point the domain to the web site on our server. Can I do this without touching the email?


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If it helps:

Clients provider is Heart, ours is 1and1.


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The thing to look into is whether the mail server has its address in the domain or not. If you switch the entire domain, using a wildcard record (often noted as @.example.com or *.example.com, then you will be knocking their e-mail off-line. But if the email is accessed through a separate server, like mail.ispname.com, then you won’t have to be so careful. But if the former is true, you can create a host record for the mail server separate from the wildcard one that catches all others.

Walter

On Apr 16, 2016, at 10:30 AM, neil.west1 email@hidden wrote:

If it helps:

Clients provider is Heart, ours is 1and1.


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Do the site and domain have to be with the same provider to be recognised as ‘hosted’?

I think Walter has this covered in his reply.

There is a lot of “The Dark Arts” going on when it comes to hosting/servers etc. A reseller plan with a good Hosting Provider goes a long way to shield you from all of this.

Alternatively leave the hosting with https://www.heartinternet.uk/ - not one I have had any dealings with but if the client already has his email etc. running through them it will probably give you less grief - provided they offer industry standard servers (no Windoze stuff)

D


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