[Pro] Wordpress?

I’ve read that Wordpress runs 27% of the web. Does anyone have a breakdown of the other 73%? Trying figure out my next move. Thanks in advance.


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It really depends on what you define as the Web. For some people, it means Facebook. I would suspect for a non-trivial percentage of people, actually. If you mean “independently hosted Web properties”, then a lot of them come out of systems like SquareSpace or Wix, where you pick a template and paste in your content. That’s not a contradiction, necessarily, as Pixar uses SquareSpace, and you wouldn’t think that pixar.com was not its own site.

There’s a certain percentage that are hand-crafted, either using a visual or code-centric tool. That’s getting to be a hobby, though, since having a simple and static Web site, however beautiful and artistically pleasing, is of limited value today – you can get a lot more bang from a well-run Facebook page in terms of return on investment or effort.

As you move into the realm of businesses and web applications (think of americanexpress.com or your bank, or a medium to high-end catalog like williams-sonoma.com) you will find professionally designed sites, hand-coded by teams of experts, and more application than web. Forced to guess, I would say there are maybe a few thousand companies in the world who could build one of those. There are an awful lot more companies who need a site and can’t afford to be Amex, and so there are a lot of budget-rate contractors out there who will take Wordpress, a handful of plug-ins, and some dodgy procedural PHP code their cousin wrote, and build an e-commerce site with it. Will it work? Probably. But that company who bought it had better pray they don’t become successful too fast, or they will run off the end of the runway and hit some trees and power lines.

The best way to describe this is what is often referred to as “the long tail”. You have a graph of how sites get made, and on one side is a medium-sized mountain called Wordpress, and then it curves off asymptotically to a long and shallow curve made up of as many different ways to make sites as there are sites, statistically speaking.

Walter

On Jan 5, 2018, at 7:08 AM, chod email@hidden wrote:

I’ve read that Wordpress runs 27% of the web. Does anyone have a breakdown of the other 73%? Trying figure out my next move. Thanks in advance.


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Thanks for the response Walter. I also got a response from Quora. Here’s a link to that breakdown.
https://w3techs.com/technologies/overview/content_management/all


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On 5 Jan 2018, 1:27 pm, waltd wrote:

There are an awful lot more companies who need a site and can’t afford to be Amex, and so there are a lot of budget-rate contractors out there who will take Wordpress, a handful of plug-ins, and some dodgy procedural PHP code their cousin wrote, and build an e-commerce site with it. Will it work? Probably. But that company who bought it had better pray they don’t become successful too fast, or they will run off the end of the runway and hit some trees and power lines.

I’ve seen this firsthand. I ran a site for years and it was overdue for an update. I was a volunteer. I was willing to do the update and my experience with the site gave me ideas on how I thought it should work, but I was not willing to do the large project without a fee. For whatever reason, they got someone else in the neighborhood to do it instead. She used WP. She has had all sorts of issues with it, not the least of which are attacks trying to hack the site. One was successful (possibly due to some old code of mine that was lying around in the archive of the old site, but odd that the issue never came up until the new site) and crashed the site because of all the hits it generated and the hosting company shut it down. She’s now paying for some company that monitors attempts to attack the site. She’s had problems with plugins that stopped working, most notably the one that connects to PayPal so the club can collect dues.

I had a real client that switched to a WP site, and then at some point, her plugins started conflicting and weird things started happening. Then she contacted me and I actually used the old, turn half of them off, see if it works, turn half of the half back on, etc., until it stops working again method. What a mess.

I tried WP for a simple site of mine, but that’s all it is, a simple blog. I would not use it for more than that.

OTOH, I’ve heard good things about SquareSpace.


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One of the issues I have when I work on a Wordpress site is that the tail is very much wagging the dog.

If you keep things simple, a few pages and blog then it’s OK. But get bogged down with loads of plugins it can become a nightmare to run especially if things start to go wrong. The average user knows little about creating a staging area to test changes before going live, often relying on the live version only. And when things go wrong, its get harder to fix.

On a commercial point of view, many new clients often want rescuing from the Wordpress back end as they don’t understand how to use it after a designer has created a site for them.

For me this is where Perch CMS steps in. It’s far easier on the client side to manage and more than powerful when things start to grow (Perch Runway).

David Owen
Printline Advertising

http://www.printlineadvertising.co.uk
http://www.davidowendesign.com

Creative Design | Print Production | Web Design & Strategy | Domains & Web Hosting

On 6 Jan 2018, at 14:09, Joe Muscara email@hidden wrote:

I tried WP for a simple site of mine, but that’s all it is, a simple blog. I would not use it for more than that.


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